The Cradle of Avaritia ~A Parable

Cave Art, Tadrart Acacus mountains, Libya

Cave Art, Tadrart Acacus mountains, Libya

…there was so much more than they could see, so much more that they could be…

In the deep heart of winter a caveman had been hunting in the depths of the frozen forest. He had trapped a huge wild boar. He felt enormous pride at the big beast slung effortlessly across his powerful shoulders as he made his way back to his tribe.

The women had been at work too, gathering. As he approached he saw they had little to show for their efforts, a meagre ration of bitter berries and pungent leaves. He did not care for such fare.

He wanted the Boar all for himself. The hide would clothe him in fine style and the meat would fill his belly. With a huge roar, he frightened them away from their cave, determined not to share with them.

Outside the cave the women took refuge huddled in the hollow of a huge tree. They were hungry. They were cold. And they were frightened. The women wept.

Worried they would take his huge hoard of meat whilst he slept, he started piling huge chunks of limestone at the cave entrance.

The pile of stones grew higher.

The women came. The women pleaded.

He roared. He added more stones.

But in the cave he had no water and he had no wood to make fire.

The meat started to rot.

Still the women came.

Still he would not share.

The snow melted and spring dressed the Earth in a gown of green.The women working together gathered many fruits, berries, nuts and herbs and pure water from the stream. They ate and they drank and they were well. Pleased with their progress, they called to the caveman to come share in their bounty.

He mistrusted them, fearing a trap to get his meat. He added even more stones to the cave entrance.

He was now almost in complete darkness.

Time to time the women would go to the cave to see if the caveman would come out, to join the tribe once more. Their entreaties would be met with yet another ferocious roar.

In the gloom he could not see his meat was infected by maggots. He continued to eat the infected meat, until only the bones were left. He gnawed on the bones not wanting to share any of his bounty. When he was done gorging he fell ill. Very ill. The maggots were now inside him, eating away.

He weakly cried for help, but none came. The women could not hear him. He had built the stones too high.

Outside the cave, the tribe thrived for after the harsh winter Earth was bountiful and provided for all their needs. The women were gatherers and not hunters and so the  animals became their friends and showed them where they could forage and find even more fruits of the forest. They wove clothes from  leaves and reeds. And life was good. As they received from nature, so they gave back, walking gently upon the Earth, the Great Mother.

They wanted the caveman to share for they knew his meat would not last forever. And so the women went back to the cave but the caveman roared no more. The stones were too high and packed so tight that the women could not get through the impenetrable wall the caveman built. Reluctantly, and with heavy hearts, they left the forest.

The tribe continued to work together, to share and care and co-create. This way knowledge became power. They used their new found power wisely and in doing so each one became a Creatrix. The women knew there was so much more than they could see, so much more that they could be. Building a raft and following the path of the river they set out to cross the sunlit sea. Not knowing where they were going, but confident that they were better together and all their needs would be met.

They had set off for a brave new world and would take the caveman with them ~ for his seed was growing within the bellies of some, although not all,  of the women.

Eons passed.

A team of archaeologists found the cave. The bones of the caveman lay with the bones of the boar, so entwined it was hard to distinguish them as separate creatures. They puzzled to gain understanding of the significance of the bones and the cave…

…The place where Greed had been born in the world…

© Eily Nash November ©2017

 

 

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